Forum › Throw Away the Suit Together discussion

joined Sep 1, 2021

i checked tags twice while reading following with relief sighs, otherwise it would break me. people give up and commit suicide or keep going on which is wiser for a healthy mind.. life is a game youre forced to play unless you have nothing that bounds you to life. i couldve kill myself if i didnt have my sister crying for me in front of me. one must get through those phases this way or another.

Cerberus_pikomarie-supersmall
joined Feb 27, 2019

yknow i kept thinking about this work and it's like. a reverse christmas hallmark movie. it's sort of refreshing. and although the ending was quite bittersweet. i dunno. i like it.

RadiosAreObsolete
Img_20210321_022239%20(2)
joined Mar 6, 2021

[...] Now, do I think this author planned on making this a realism piece? No. What I think happened is that they tried to make an escapism story, but accidently created a narrative that was too similar to their own. And overtime, the parallel between their real life and the story caused a pessimism which seeped into their work. [...]

That's the feeling I got as well. For the past few chapters it seemed as though the mood of the manga had shifted from hopeful to pessimistic, but I kept expecting that things would somehow work out and it would end on a happier note. While I generally enjoy realism in fiction, what makes this ending kind of disappointing is that it doesn't seem to align with what the story was supposed to be when it started. I'm not even sure if I would call this bittersweet, it felt like a feeble attempt of the author to make a completely pessimistic —especially compared to the beginning— ending seem happier than it actually is.

American_virgin
joined May 25, 2014

I liked the ending. "No matter where you go, you will be there."

At some point, you can't unrun your own feelings and need to learn how to process them and face them head on instead of letting them dictate your life. I feel that the lesson the characters learned was something like that.

Find value in what's working your life, and you can perservere through what's not, until you figure out how to make it work. Needing everything to be working out all the time is the best way to be miserable and desperate.

American_virgin
joined May 25, 2014

yknow i kept thinking about this work and it's like. a reverse christmas hallmark movie. it's sort of refreshing. and although the ending was quite bittersweet. i dunno. i like it.

Reverse Christmas Hallmark is a great way to describe it.

joined Feb 23, 2020

I feel the ending is less bittersweet and more like "They learned what really matters." Haru was pressuring herself so much to get a job that it was ruining her life both in Tokyo and in the Island, no matter where she was that would ruin her and Hinoto's time together.
Meanwhile Hinoto was doing the same to herself with the marriage certificate.
But they were having such a good time at the start, what happened? The pressure happened. Same happened in Tokyo, same would happen anywhere. What they learned is that what makes their life so fun is each other and that's what they had to value. Haru is working hard trying to get a office job while working part time, Hinoto got a job, they can make it in Tokyo. And here's the thing, had Honito go to Tokyo and Haru stayed in the island, do you really think they would be happy? I doubt it, one of them would go back to the other.
The ending is about them realizing that as long as they have one another and throw away this idea that everything has to be perfect they can be happy, what makes life good for them is one another not some job.

Lojsdbe
joined Sep 16, 2019

Yeah, I don't like the ending. I understand what others are saying about them "learning what really matters," but it honestly still feels so disappointing. Like, at the start of this we're shown two girls who have been absolutely beaten down by the world they're living in, and who resolve to find a place where they don't have to live under the weight of those expectations. It felt like it was as much a rebellion as it was an escape. To end it all by effectively saying, "the problem wasn't their situation, it was their attitudes," feels so lame.

I don't know, maybe I just came into this story with the wrong mindset. Maybe this story was always meant to be a pragmatically "realistic" story with some fluff. Maybe the author always intended to subvert audience expectations and turn a tale of romantic escapism into a realistic tale about finding what really matters. All I know is that it is not what I was reading this manga for, that the ending does not vibe with me, and that I won't be rereading it or picking up any official releases anytime soon.

Thanks to the scalation team for their hard work, but yeah, not for me.

last edited at Aug 5, 2023 6:58PM

Weiwei
joined Oct 9, 2017

Haha it was very realistic, sounds like the life of a lot of people I know, including myself. At least they have love so it's a pretty good ending. I'm fine with that.

joined Feb 1, 2021

just because it was futile doesn't mean it was meaningless

"One must imagine Sisyphus happy."

joined Jul 29, 2021

damn, wasn’t expecting the crushing reality of capitalism to win, but at least they didn’t break up and or kms so silver lining ig? great story tho, loved it

7c3371fc-1218-42e3-9009-8520d7f626fa
joined Sep 15, 2020

At this point with the way people are hyper analyzing and focusing on the English title of “Throw Away the Suit Together” and seeing this solely as a run away from the life sucking corporate workforce should know the Japanese title is “君としらない夏になる“ or properly translated “Into a Summer I Never Knew With You”.

While yes, the story’s catalyst was Haru being over-encumbered with stress by the perpetual work rejections and them running away as a result, it was never solely about it. From the Japanese title, it clearly is less work focused unlike the English one and more about a brand new experiences, the good and bad ones, during the summer they were on the island. Their time on the island also shows how important it is to realize running away from problems isn’t a permanent solution because they will have to face the reality of those problems sooner or later, and that in the end they didn’t let those problems break them apart.

I do think when the story releases in English, Seven Seas should rethink the localized title over to not give people a different expectations about the focus of the story.

Lady Lamperouge
__c_c_code_geass_drawn_by_creayus__865456f1cfacc546b5861bbfed2beb26
joined Jan 22, 2023

Yeah, I don't like the ending. I understand what others are saying about them "learning what really matters," but it honestly still feels so disappointing. Like, at the start of this we're shown two girls who have been absolutely beaten down by the world they're living in, and who resolve to find a place where they don't have to live under the weight of those expectations. It felt like it was as much a rebellion as it was an escape. To end it all by effectively saying, "the problem wasn't their situation, it was their attitudes," feels so lame.

I don't know, maybe I just came into this story with the wrong mindset. Maybe this story was always meant to be a pragmatically "realistic" story with some fluff. Maybe the author always intended to subvert audience expectations and turn a tale of romantic escapism into a realistic tale about finding what really matters. All I know is that it is not what I was reading this manga for, that the ending does not vibe with me, and that I won't be rereading it or picking up any official releases anytime soon.

Thanks to the scalation team for their hard work, but yeah, not for me.

Second this.

Dc42c421b77cd6d3084fe2db220282e3
joined Aug 16, 2020

Shockingly good. A very real and emotionally honest story about love in the face of an unkind reality. In the early chapters there was a growing sense of unease, lingering shots of our girls silently stressed out, problems beginning to crop up that get waved off with half formed plans. This was coming the entire time.

But it wasn't for nothing. For awhile they really did get to feel happy, unburdened, and closer than ever. They got to experience each other's best sides. When you love someone, when you catch a glimpse of what a happy life with them could be, you'll push through anything for the chance to make that your normal.

They were never gonna be able to make a perfect life so easily. They didn't have the means. But they've found a happiness to strive for and a happiness to get them through the worst of times. That's love. That's yuri baybee.

Anyway I loved this and it deeply affected me thanks

Screenshot_20231219-103652~2
joined Sep 10, 2022

At this point with the way people are hyper analyzing and focusing on the English title of “Throw Away the Suit Together” and seeing this solely as a run away from the life sucking corporate workforce should know the Japanese title is “君としらない夏になる“ or properly translated “Into a Summer I Never Knew With You”.

While yes, the story’s catalyst was Haru being over-encumbered with stress by the perpetual work rejections and them running away as a result, it was never solely about it. From the Japanese title, it clearly is less work focused unlike the English one and more about a brand new experiences, the good and bad ones, during the summer they were on the island. Their time on the island also shows how important it is to realize running away from problems isn’t a permanent solution because they will have to face the reality of those problems sooner or later, and that in the end they didn’t let those problems break them apart. I do think when the story releases in English, Seven Seas should rethink the localized title over to not give people a different expectations about the focus of the story.

Good point. Especially the "with you" in the title. Forgot to mention that in my comment about the story's focus. Always a weird English title and an example of the problems that can cause. Maybe helped cause at least some of the different expectations.

"One must imagine Sisyphus happy."

Appropriate!

Shockingly good. A very real and emotionally honest story about love in the face of an unkind reality. In the early chapters there was a growing sense of unease, lingering shots of our girls silently stressed out, problems beginning to crop up that get waved off with half formed plans. This was coming the entire time. They were never gonna be able to make a perfect life so easily. They didn't have the means. But they've found a happiness to strive for and a happiness to get them through the worst of times. That's love. That's yuri baybee.

Same. The seeds were there from the start. Stories like these hit closer exactly because they are relatable. You can take the lessons from these and really apply them to your own life in a way that purely escapist fiction does not
always allow.

last edited at Aug 6, 2023 8:57AM

Images
joined Apr 7, 2021

So many describing this as realistic worries me. As a very ''free spirited'' kind of person I did not manage to meet the expectations society has for us. Everywhere you go there will be opportunities and people willing to help you. Life does not need to be this grey.

Img_0215
joined Jul 29, 2017

So many describing this as realistic worries me. As a very ''free spirited'' kind of person I did not manage to meet the expectations society has for us. Everywhere you go there will be opportunities and people willing to help you. Life does not need to be this grey.

Yeah, I’m hardly the freest spirit in the world, but “You know those dreams you have of escaping the rat race?—don’t bother” doesn’t exactly resonate,

last edited at Aug 6, 2023 10:15AM

Screenshot_20231219-103652~2
joined Sep 10, 2022

So many describing this as realistic worries me. As a very ''free spirited'' kind of person I did not manage to meet the expectations society has for us. Everywhere you go there will be opportunities and people willing to help you. Life does not need to be this grey.

Guess it depends on outlook and whether you view them as defeated at the end, or not. I don't view them as defeated or sad. They're happy and continuing to move forward, having had new life experiences and newfound focuses. They did get that help from many people throughout the manga but it didn't workout. Yet, they're still open to new opportunities, they're relationship stronger as a result. That's what they're searching for as they separate for the day. They're still fighting, still dreaming. It just has taken a detour. I don't think the story is saying not to dream or that dreams are always unattainable.

last edited at Aug 6, 2023 10:50AM

RadiosAreObsolete
Img_20210321_022239%20(2)
joined Mar 6, 2021

So many describing this as realistic worries me. As a very ''free spirited'' kind of person I did not manage to meet the expectations society has for us. Everywhere you go there will be opportunities and people willing to help you. Life does not need to be this grey.

I get what you mean (even though I was one of the people that referred to this as realistic). It's something I was thinking but I now realize I didn't include in my first comment: you can be realistic and still be hopeful, which is what I was expecting of this manga. And yet we got a side of realism that tends to dismiss the happier scenarios as fantasy, which unfortunately aligns with my own mindset.

On another note, seeing the title translation another commenter suggested above I can see this being the ending the author had in mind from the beginning, with "summer" indicating that their adventure would inevitably come an end and they could only ever hope to get a break from their lives in Tokyo, rather than leave them behind completely. It's interesting to think about how much the title of a story can affect the readers' impression of it (and I say this as a reader who wasn't that hang up on the title in the first place).

Old%20man%20prof
joined Oct 25, 2022

At this point with the way people are hyper analyzing and focusing on the English title of “Throw Away the Suit Together” and seeing this solely as a run away from the life sucking corporate workforce should know the Japanese title is “君としらない夏になる“ or properly translated “Into a Summer I Never Knew With You”.

It is an interesting point to consider, because while the Japanese title is 君としらない夏になる, it is also "Throw Away the Suit Together". That English title isn't an invention of the scanlators or the localizers, it's literally printed on the cover of the Japanese volumes. And considering how it's not even close to a literal translation, it definitely feels like an intentional choice rather than Engrish gone wrong. It makes me wonder what the mangaka/editor's reasons were for choosing it, because it's not like "Into a Summer I Never Knew With You" is a bad title at all.

I do think when the story releases in English, Seven Seas should rethink the localized title over to not give people a different expectations about the focus of the story.

I think Seven Seas is going with the Romanized title of "Kimi to Shiranai Natsu ni Naru". At least that's what they announced it as in their press release.

Screenshot_20231219-103652~2
joined Sep 10, 2022

At this point with the way people are hyper analyzing and focusing on the English title of “Throw Away the Suit Together” and seeing this solely as a run away from the life sucking corporate workforce should know the Japanese title is “君としらない夏になる“ or properly translated “Into a Summer I Never Knew With You”.

It is an interesting point to consider, because while the Japanese title is 君としらない夏になる, it is also "Throw Away the Suit Together". That English title isn't an invention of the scanlators or the localizers, it's literally printed on the cover of the Japanese volumes. And considering how it's not even close to a literal translation, it definitely feels like an intentional choice rather than Engrish gone wrong. It makes me wonder what the mangaka/editor's reasons were for choosing it, because it's not like "Into a Summer I Never Knew With You" is a bad title at all.

"Throw Away the Suit Together" is the subtitle. The English version's turning the subtitle into the title (and dropping the real title) is where the real issue comes from. It's good that Seven Seas will use the full title, though. The reasons for choosing that subtitle might still be interesting to learn, but sometimes the reasons for chosen English phrases are a bit suspect.

last edited at Aug 6, 2023 12:34PM

Dc42c421b77cd6d3084fe2db220282e3
joined Aug 16, 2020

So many describing this as realistic worries me. As a very ''free spirited'' kind of person I did not manage to meet the expectations society has for us. Everywhere you go there will be opportunities and people willing to help you. Life does not need to be this grey.

But there were opportunities and people willing to help. They grew from this, got to experience something lovely, and gained something to strive for. Even if they don't have it now, it can be their north star to get through a life that was previously directionlessly miserable. The ending is bittersweet and rough, but it shows a couple who have gained the capacity to break free of the drudgery. It's just gonna take some work. Sometimes that's how it is.

Img_0215
joined Jul 29, 2017

So many describing this as realistic worries me. As a very ''free spirited'' kind of person I did not manage to meet the expectations society has for us. Everywhere you go there will be opportunities and people willing to help you. Life does not need to be this grey.

But there were opportunities and people willing to help. They grew from this, got to experience something lovely, and gained something to strive for. Even if they don't have it now, it can be their north star to get through a life that was previously directionlessly miserable.

Wait, how is the thing that they were unable to make work “their north star” that they can “strive for”?

Are they supposed to go through the drudgery of their present jobs in order to save up for the opportunity to try to do again the thing that didn’t work the the first time?

Or do they sit on the couch at the end of a hard week having a beer and wistfully saying, “Remember that one summer we took off and went to the island? That was so great . . . Too bad we can’t do that”?

Screenshot_20231219-103652~2
joined Sep 10, 2022

Are they supposed to go through the drudgery of their present jobs in order to save up for the opportunity to try to do again the thing that didn’t work the the first time?
Or do they sit on the couch at the end of a hard week having a beer and wistfully saying, “Remember that one summer we took off and went to the island? That was so great . . . Too bad we can’t do that”?

They could do either of those things. The ending can be viewed pessimistically or optimistically. Like with most open endings, it really depends on the reader's own outlook more than anything. So there'll likely always be those disagreements.

We'll never know how it truly ends up, beyond the fact that they are definitively together at the end, and clearly present themselves as smiling, happy and still determined to succeed. The endings tone is bright. They have confident strides, as Hinoto begins to say something that strongly hints at her future intent. They weren't prepared before but who is to say what'll happen next? Personally, having seen them fight throughout this story, I trust their ability and desire to continue forward; I find enviable strength, perseverance and hope from their depiction. It could have ended with a narrator's "ganbare, girls!" and that would have fit the mood.

Just wish we had more time with them.

last edited at Aug 6, 2023 4:25PM

Ykn1
joined Dec 20, 2018

Well, that could have gone better, but it could also have gone so much worse, and in the end they've arrived at a place where they're not quite where they want to be yet, but are steadily working towards it, no longer suffering under all the stress and depression that plagued their past.

Img_0215
joined Jul 29, 2017

Well, that could have gone better, but it could also have gone so much worse, and in the end they've arrived at a place where they're not quite where they want to be yet, but are steadily working towards it, no longer suffering under all the stress and depression that plagued their past.

What exactly is the thing/place they are they “working towards,” and how exactly are they working towards it? They’re back in Tokyo, apparently with one full-time and one part-time job.

I get the “good times and friends we made along the way” thing, and also the “at least they’re not dead” thing, but given the trajectory of the action, I still don’t see this as an earned happy ending.

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