Forum › Legality of this site in Canada?

Fbphoto
joined Feb 26, 2018

So, with any luck, a year or so from now I'll be a Canadian.

This site hosts some material with the Lolicon tag, which in addition to grossing me out incredibly, is as I understand it illegal in Canada.

What, then, is the legality of accessing this site from the great white north? Would I end up in jail because of some of the stuff hosted here? I'd hate to miss out on the genuinely good content because of the admins' decision to host that sludge here...

UranusAndNeptuneAreJustCousins
joined Sep 6, 2015

Considering that 1) there are plenty of Canadians here already, including one prominent member of the staff; and 2) you are asking whether or not a site hosting pirated manga is illegal, I have got to ask, is this a serious question or did you just want to complain about the contents you do not like?

last edited at Sep 25, 2020 11:07PM

Parnifia the Bastard
Chrome_2018-04-13_12-33-32-min%20(3)
joined Aug 4, 2014

This is some real low-quality memes shit right here.

Fbphoto
joined Feb 26, 2018

I am being deadly serious, and also did not know there were Canadian posters. I figured it was all Americans and Europeans.

There's also kind of a big difference between "pirating media from another country" and "hosting what the law lumps in with actual child sexual abuse imagery." For one thing, no country is going to do very much about the first, I suspect. Please don't misunderstand, I think equating drawings with actual people is beyond stupid, but force of law is force of law and I'd rather not be on the wrong side of it.

Do posters from other countries browse through VPNs, or...?

OrangePekoe Staff
Screenshot_100
joined Mar 20, 2013

Hi. Not going to entertain too many posts in this topic. The user asked a question, let's answer that question.

This is not legal advice, I do not know Canadian laws. However, what I say will generally apply to most relevant countries.

You are not under any threat of prosecution for visiting a website hosting degenerate content. You are not under any threat of prosecution from even going so far as to accidentally click or view illegal, degenerate content. If you were, Twitter and Reddit would be legally precarious sites on their own. You are responsible for the specific content you regularly access of your own volition. On the topic, if you view NSFW content in general, you may wish to read up on specific guidelines for the depiction of fictional characters of certain ages. I doubt there is a concrete answer to this latter question, as legal precedent is finicky on its own.

Best of luck in Canada. Take care.

Edit: If you are still at ill ease, keep an eye on your ISP-linked (or billing) email address. If you're doing something the government doesn't like, your ISP is very likely going to let you know about it long before law enforcement will.

last edited at Sep 25, 2020 11:22PM

Fbphoto
joined Feb 26, 2018

Hi. Not going to entertain too many posts in this topic. The user asked a question, let's answer that question.

This is not legal advice, I do not know Canadian laws. However, what I say will generally apply to most relevant countries.

You are not under any threat of prosecution for visiting a website hosting degenerate content. You are not under any threat of prosecution from even going so far as to accidentally click or view illegal, degenerate content. If you were, Twitter and Reddit would be legally precarious sites on their own. You are responsible for the specific content you regularly access of your own volition. On the topic, if you view NSFW content in general, you may wish to read up on specific guidelines for the depiction of fictional characters of certain ages. I doubt there is a concrete answer to this latter question, as legal precedent is finicky on its own.

Best of luck in Canada. Take care.

Edit: If you are still at ill ease, keep an eye on your ISP-linked (or billing) email address. If you're doing something the government doesn't like, your ISP is very likely going to let you know about it long before law enforcement will.

THIS is what I was hoping for. Thanks for taking the time and effort to put it out there. I'm just curious about the last one, though: do ISPs actually warn people? Because this sounds like political and social radioactive waste, something an unreasonable response to would get widespread social approval due to people not wanting to be guilty by association. As much as lolicon squicks me, I know the difference between a drawing and a person, and would rather paedos sate themselves on drawings than people...

Pikachuwhat
joined Mar 13, 2014

lmfao

GendoIkari Uploader
Tsuglenda
joined Aug 10, 2011

It is the duty of all citizens to violate laws that are unjust. Should a nation such as Canada ban lolicon, or inter Germans in concentration camps, or blockade first nations from fishing in their own waters, it would be necessary for those of good conscience to violently resist.The peaceful transfer of power and rectification of injustice is an intentionally slow and weak process, only mass direct action can guarantee a better society.

I'm just curious about the last one, though: do ISPs actually warn people

I'm somewhat of an ISP myself, any notice your ISP gets is forwarded to you and they cut you off if you get too many. Generally this means DMCA violations, don't think anyone's ever proposed or implemented a CSEM strike system since generally one is bad enough to orbital strike your house.

last edited at Sep 26, 2020 1:12AM

_20180228_203946
joined Jan 24, 2018

... Kinda off topic but, reminded me of how one of the Australian senators is trying to put some kind of ban on anime and some content within it after watching a few episodes of Eromanga sensei.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-02-29/mps-wants-review-of-classification-laws-for-manga-and-anime/12012522
I found it odd that they wanted to block fictional content yet recently a bank here in aus is facing billions in fines due to Australian pedos making overseas transactions to perform child abuse using this bank and the authorities not being informed..... There a bank, I don't understand how they'd know specifically where the money goes, yet they cop a fine and the legal system just blames them instead of seeing a problem with letting known pedoes have free roam in the first place? Kinda feel like something's being swept under the rug when they point a finger at the banks saying children are being sexually abused because of you, not our own negligence in keeping an eye on known criminals being able to do so

GendoIkari Uploader
Tsuglenda
joined Aug 10, 2011

There a bank, I don't understand how they'd know specifically where the money goes

It makes sense for underfunded regulator agencies to go after banks, they have the money, and banks have the legal responsibility to flag and report suspicious transactions.

Reimu-pet-cirno
joined May 17, 2013

If you're concerned about getting in trouble over internet activity, I'd get a VPN. There are plenty enough to choose from(though I'd disregard NordVPN due to their handling of the hacking issue).

W
joined Jun 5, 2015

Polycell posted:

If you're concerned about getting in trouble over internet activity, I'd get a VPN. There are plenty enough to choose from(though I'd disregard NordVPN due to their handling of the hacking issue).

What hacking issue?

Reimu-pet-cirno
joined May 17, 2013

They were hacked in early 2018 but didn't report it until late 2019. It wasn't the most severe, but sitting on it that long doesn't exactly engender trust.

Webp.net-resizeimage%20(1)
joined Jan 7, 2018

... Kinda off topic but, reminded me of how one of the Australian senators is trying to put some kind of ban on anime and some content within it after watching a few episodes of Eromanga sensei.

Also off-topic, but where is your profile pic from?

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