Forum › Do you find yourself thinking in different languages??

3631
joined Mar 31, 2012

Maybe it's just me, but when I get into a big anime kick or watch a movie with a lot of foreign languages or accents, my little head-voice starts to talk just like that too... Like, I'll be using little Japanese phrases, or talking in a British or Spanish accent. I'm not a super-big language buff or anything, but I apparently have a knack for picking up accents and pronunciation habits from other languages. Does this kinda thing happen to anyone else? Just curious :)

joined Mar 15, 2012

it sure does...^^

24
joined Oct 11, 2010

This is exactly what happens to me. It's part of why I became a linguistics major.

2SpiritCherokeePrincess
Nakoruru
joined Jun 20, 2020

Sometimes.

New%20dynasty%20reader%20profile
joined Oct 22, 2018

I can seemlessly switch between thinking in Serbocroatian and thinking in English without even noticing, so yeah, all the time. There are occasuons where different languages also get entangled, especially when I watch documentaries or TV series. Especially when trying my hardest to read place names or person names as accurately as possible.

last edited at Aug 22, 2020 3:57AM

Hino-san
joined Sep 4, 2014

Usually only if I'm reading a book or VERY text heavy manga in Japanese. Then it gets in my head. I haven't done that type of reading much lately.

L.lawliet.full.1368228_photo-resizer.ru
joined May 19, 2020

Yeah, it happens sometimes. Especially if you know more than 2 languages from my experience. I think it's cool to know a few languages. But sometimes, especially while studying, it really interferes. I remember once writing a college paper with https://au.edubirdie.com/do-my-assignment and constantly made mistakes, as Italian words were rushing into my head. I've studied Italian at the time.

last edited at Sep 14, 2020 12:27PM

joined Jan 14, 2020

I'm not really there yet, but when I left a Spanish-speaking country, it was a shift to be using English with the attendants on the (American) airline. Likewise leaving Japan after a few months for Australia. I do have arbitrary moments of using 'hai', 'da', or 'si' instead of yes. I particularly like 'nyet' for no, perhaps because it sounds like "not yet" too.

last edited at Sep 13, 2020 6:10PM

joined Jul 26, 2016

...isn't this what happens to pretty much everyone once they hit certain level of fluency? It really streamlines things when you no longer need to mentally translate to/from your native and can just switch gears on the fly.

Can also cause moments of embrassment when you're, say, reading something and don't remember to switch modes when someone speaks to you >_>

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