Forum › I Favor the Villainess discussion

4dcd5e922a6b20d034126d7ff75583f91490791092_large
joined Jan 18, 2016

i finished the novel!!

it was so fucking adorable and i totally got sucked into the universe! i reccommend to those who are really interested in this story!
also, it was so rewarding to finally see these two get together and have kids. im such a happy mfer rn

joined Jun 6, 2021

(The gold standard and mercantilism were not actually good things.)

Mercantilism is a bad thing; fiat money doesn't inhibit it.

Fiat money is a bad thing; in the long run, it is like a game of musical chairs in which most chairs will suddenly be removed all-at-once. And, historically, no state has indefinitely resisted the temptation to inflate fiat currency madly.

A standard based upon just one commodity (such as gold) is far from perfect, and states can debase such currencies; but they don't go to Hell as quickly as does fiat currency.

An ideal monetary order would require the elimination of legal-tender laws, and almost certainly have competing issuers of currencies based upon evolving baskets of multiple commodities.

Image
joined Aug 21, 2021

lady claire was too naive for the outside world. maybe she should be homeschooled?

joined Jan 14, 2020

Fiat money is a good thing, allowing money supply to be matched to economic growth. Otherwise you risk deflation, which is terrible.

The gold standard didn't even last all that long. Started in the 1800s, countries fled it in the Great Depression (recovering in about the order that they left it), people kind of tried again with Bretton Wood which lasted less than 30 years before collapsing. Fiat world has already lasted 50 years since then.

Historically money was more of a silver standard than anything else, but how well that worked depended on your silver mines... and on how good private credit systems were making up for the flaws of metallic money.

Ykn1
joined Dec 20, 2018

As amusing as the captain's DOOM face was, it doesn't even begin to compare with the vice captain brushing away the roses... :D

joined May 12, 2020

I am guessing Rei was sitting on this hairdo for this particular sleepover cuz whew lad.

last edited at Aug 23, 2021 3:41PM

Angryface
joined Mar 22, 2021

This was a great chatper. I love the little detail of everytime Claire got something right, Rei started clapping so Claire started pulling Rei's cheeks. I also love how Claire got so scared and even instead of calling her communer, actually used her name. Best of course was the end with how she was stealing all of the covers and started kicking Rei who looks like she is still smiling. Claire is still selfish in her sleep.

b0undarybreaker
C12%20wink
joined Oct 29, 2020

I think doing a lower-quality version then updating to a higher-quality one when you have the time would be a good idea if it'd lower your stress! I'd recommend putting a warning before the lower-quality one though just so people don't get super pissed.

New%20dynasty%20reader%20profile
joined Oct 22, 2018

What an amazing chapter.

LaPucelleOnGirls
La%20pucelle%2004
joined Apr 12, 2021

Oh, those type of uniforms won`t exist in their time, right?

Unnamed
joined Jul 23, 2017

"You wanted some dere scenes?"

Yes, Arigathanks for this food

Altair Uploader
Reisen%20ds
joined Nov 30, 2016

Oh, those type of uniforms won`t exist in their time, right?

The idea is that the story takes place inside of a Japanese dating sim, so the culture is a weird mashup of vaguely renaissance cultures, RPG mechanics, and artifacts from modern-day Japan.

last edited at Aug 23, 2021 6:07PM

joined Jul 25, 2021

As someone who's finished the novel I find it very interesting to see how things change in the adaptation like there's a lot of world building stuff left out in this chapter specifically.

Book%20and%20cloakhbq1
joined Aug 1, 2011

That was both a cute and disappointing chapter. We got teased with hints about burgeoning unrest between commoners and nobles, but then we were diverted to a ghost mystery with a fairly obvious twist and little in the way of new insights.

Oh well. The café looks like it would be fun, though I agree with the prince: Couches and books would make for an excellent addition to nearly any café.

As for the scanlator's question at the end (I think they're on here?). I'd prefer there just be one release, rather than an early release followed by a later one. The two-step release makes it much easier to miss it entirely if you don't want to read the draft version. Also, a few days, either way, doesn't seem like it would change much when the periods between releases are both relatively fixed and significantly larger then the gap is likely to be.

Fiat money is a bad thing; in the long run, it is like a game of musical chairs in which most chairs will suddenly be removed all-at-once. And, historically, no state has indefinitely resisted the temptation to inflate fiat currency madly.

You say that as if fiat currencies have existed for more than a few decades. That said, I can't think of many countries that gave into the urge to "inflate the currency madly". At least not ones that weren't already in the process of collapsing. Do you have any data to back up your claim?

A standard based upon just one commodity (such as gold) is far from perfect, and states can debase such currencies; but they don't go to Hell as quickly as does fiat currency.

There are also issues with things like countries leveraging asymmetric trade to drain each other's gold reserves, even if the trade wouldn't otherwise negatively impact their economy, and the monetary supply having literally nothing to do with the productive capacity of the country.

An ideal monetary order would require the elimination of legal-tender laws, and almost certainly have competing issuers of currencies based upon evolving baskets of multiple commodities.

And that causes even more problems, not the least of which are things like company scrip, abusive payment requirements, and an exponentially more complicated tax process.

Currencies, at least in the way your talking about them, are one of those things were "free markets" make absolutely no sense.

last edited at Aug 23, 2021 6:52PM

joined May 21, 2021

Rei and Relaire: a troublesome duo for Claire

D05536d6-01d1-4527-9102-4cc772fad5ed
joined Jul 6, 2020

Lambert brushing the roases away made me laugh out loud, so many good little details and gags in this chapter that couldn’t be shown in the novel.

I really love their random modern japanese tracksuits, and I especially loved seeing Rei’s hair bun and Claire’s ponytail. Rei is kinda a hunk when her hair is up like that huh…

also check out the expressions of Yuu and Misha’s faces on page 7 when they finalize the decision to do a crossdressing cafe…

joined Apr 15, 2018

Rei: At last, I get to sleep with Claire!
(experiences sleeping with Claire; she kicks!)
Rei: ... okay, this could be a problem.

last edited at Aug 23, 2021 7:53PM

joined Jan 14, 2020

Eh, noble couples usually have their own bedrooms anyway. You get together for sex.

joined Jun 6, 2021

Fiat money is a good thing, allowing money supply to be matched to economic growth. Otherwise you risk deflation, which is terrible.

Fiat money has always resulted in runaway inflation of the monetary stock, in turn resulting in runaway inflation of prices. And nothing prevents ultimate collapse of the purchasing power of fiat money. There is literally no basis for its sustaining value; it is a pure bubble.

Meanwhile, if commodity-backed money begins to gain purchasing power then it is drawn from its non-monetary use (remember that it is a commodity!), which increases the money supply. And if begins to lose purchasing power, then the commodity becomes relatively more valuable in uses other than as money, and it is withdrawn from monetary use, which decreases the money supply.

The gold standard didn't even last all that long. Started in the 1800s, countries fled it in the Great Depression (recovering in about the order that they left it), people kind of tried again with Bretton Wood which lasted less than 30 years before collapsing. Fiat world has already lasted 50 years since then.

No one here has advocate the gold standard in particular. But your history is muddled. The US was on a de facto gold standard from 1834 until the Civil War, a de jure gold standard from 1873 until 1933, and a gold-exchange standard from 1933 until 1971; early during the gold-exchange standard, the money was debased. Whereas recovery from the Depression of the early '20s took about a year, the Great Depression dragged-on for many years (and in this sense became Great) because the response was technocratic, including manipulation of the money supply.

Historically money was more of a silver standard than anything else,

Indeed, historically silver was the monetary base, and conversion to gold was part of a joint effort of political officials and of bankers to reshape the economy.

but how well that worked depended on your silver mines... '

Nope. You are basically imagining commodity-backed money not as backed by a commodity, but as backed by a substance that is not a commodity. See my discussion above.

and on how good private credit systems were making up for the flaws of metallic money.

Whether one has commodity-backed money or fiat money, the private credit institutions do not have a mission to offset the flaws; their mission is to enhance the potential.

Book%20and%20cloakhbq1
joined Aug 1, 2011

Fiat money has always resulted in runaway inflation of the monetary stock, in turn resulting in runaway inflation of prices.

That is an incredible claim. Do you have a source for it.

Omochikaeri_thumb
joined Nov 2, 2013

Claire crossdressing? Yes please

joined Jun 6, 2021

Fiat money is a bad thing; in the long run, it is like a game of musical chairs in which most chairs will suddenly be removed all-at-once. And, historically, no state has indefinitely resisted the temptation to inflate fiat currency madly.

You say that as if fiat currencies have existed for more than a few decades.

Inconvertible paper money has been repeatedly introduced over the centuries, beginning in China.

That said, I can't think of many countries that gave into the urge to "inflate the currency madly". At least not ones that weren't already in the process of collapsing. Do you have any data to back up your claim?

America alone has had three distinct episodes of unconvertible paper money (four if the Confederacy is counted separately), and the world has had a great many. (China, France, Germany, Austria, Greece, Argentina, Zimbabwe, and Venezuela come immediately to mind.) In the case of America, learn for example about the Continental Bills of Credit.

A standard based upon just one commodity (such as gold) is far from perfect, and states can debase such currencies; but they don't go to Hell as quickly as does fiat currency.

There are also issues with things like countries leveraging asymmetric trade to drain each other's gold reserves, even if the trade wouldn't otherwise negatively impact their economy, and the monetary supply having literally nothing to do with the productive capacity of the country.

You are here thinking exactly like a mercantilist. If goods can be bought cheaply in nation B because nation A is selling them thus to acquire the currency of nation B, then buyers from other nations have incentive to move their holdings of that currency into nation B to make purchases. And, as whatever commodity is used as money become more dear as money, there is incentive both to produce more of it and to shift more of it from other uses into use as money.

And you should take a look at the expansion of the US money supply relative to that of the American GDP over the last twenty years; the former certainly does not reflect the latter.

An ideal monetary order would require the elimination of legal-tender laws, and almost certainly have competing issuers of currencies based upon evolving baskets of multiple commodities.

And that causes even more problems, not the least of which are things like company scrip, abusive payment requirements, and an exponentially more complicated tax process.

To the extent that the mythology of abusive company scrip and payment systems has actually been researched, it has been falsified. See, for example, “Did Coal Miners ‘Owe Their Souls to the Company Store’? Theory and Evidence from the Early 1900s” by Price V. Fishback in The Journal of Economic History v46 #4. Much of what is taught as economic history is little better than Just So Stories.

(As an undergraduate seeking a BSc in economics, I was required to declare a field of specialization. I had enough coursework each in money-and-banking and in economic history; I chose the former. I moved to different fields in graduate school.)

Currencies, at least in the way your talking about them, are one of those things were "free markets" make absolutely no sense.

In response to that bald claim, I'll make a bald denial.

joined Jun 6, 2021

Fiat money has always resulted in runaway inflation of the monetary stock, in turn resulting in runaway inflation of prices.

That is an incredible claim. Do you have a source for it.

Don't expect me to reply instantaneously to multiple people each making multiple mistakes. You already asked that question, and I answered it in a reasonable interval.

What's actually remarkable here is not my claim, but that you would pontificate about this topic with such a weak background in the subject.

Commandershepard13
1071350_639308102760295_1399509523_o
joined Mar 24, 2014

Fiat money has always resulted in runaway inflation of the monetary stock, in turn resulting in runaway inflation of prices.

That is an incredible claim. Do you have a source for it.

Don't engage this wanker. He's just a troll.

Miowink
joined Aug 21, 2020

God that was cute. They look so good with their hair up.

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